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Get the Facts

The United States State Department defines sex trafficking as when a person is required to engage in a commercial sex act as the result of force, threats of force, fraud, coercion or any combination of such means.

Human trafficking encompasses several types of exploitation:
 

  • forced labor

  • sex trafficking

  • forced marriage

Statistics

Reliable statistics related to the sex and human trafficking industries are difficult to gather and analyze, both internationally and domestically. This lack of available data is due to:

  • the hidden nature of the crime

  • challenges in identifying individual victims

  • gaps in data accuracy and completeness

  • significant barriers regarding the sharing of victim information among various stakeholders

 

Still, we know that women and girls are disproportionately impacted by human trafficking.

Knowledge Is Power

Although not all sex work is considered trafficking, it’s important to know that if you are selling sex or performing sexual acts against your will, you are legally a trafficking victim. Common types of sex trafficking include escort services, pornography, illicit massage businesses, brothels, and outdoor solicitation. 

Risk Factors

Often, traffickers prey on victims’ vulnerabilities to create dependency. Significant risk factors include:

  • a recent move or migration

  • drug or alcohol use

  • mental health concerns

  • having experienced violence in the past

  • unstable family life or involvement with the child welfare system

  • being a runaway or homeless youth

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NATIONAL HUMAN TRAFFICKING HOTLINE  

If you or someone you know is in danger, don't hesitate to get help.

News Stories

71%

of modern slavery victims in 2016 were female.

99%

of the victims of forced labor in the commercial sex industry are female.

84%

of the victims of forced marriages are female.

The Numbers

The International Labour Organization’s 2017 report Global Estimates of Modern Slavery, revealed some shocking numbers.

40 million

people around the world were victims of trafficking in 2016. 

4.8 million

people are trafficked for forced sexual exploitation every day.

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Please note that we are not a hotline and are unable to respond to individual requests. If you are in crisis or know someone who is, visit our NEED HELP? page for a list of organizations that can provide support.